Stuart Blakley

Apr 17
“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  
Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria. 

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  
Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria.

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

Apr 17
“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  
Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria. 

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  
Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria.

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

Apr 17
“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  
Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria. 

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  
Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria.

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

Apr 17
“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel. 

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria. 

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored. 

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria.

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

Apr 17
“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  
Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria. 

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  
Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

“We’re marching to Syon, beautiful, beautiful Syon…”

Syon Park, a country house revamped in the 18th century and a 21st century five star hotel.  

Yes, the somewhat surprising addition to the environs of the Duke and Duchess of Northumberland’s city pad is the new Waldorf Astoria.

The roof of the mansion is currently being restored.  

Rumour has it that the ‘tour de force’ known as Jane, the 12th Duchess, has plans to transform the estate, no doubt energised by the sweeping success of her Alnwick Garden at their country pile.

Apr 10
Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.
Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:
“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:
The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.
One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.

Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:

“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:

  1. The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
  2. The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
  3. in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
  4. The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
  5. In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.

One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Apr 10
Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.
Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:
“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:
The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.
One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.”

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.

Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:

“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:

  1. The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
  2. The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
  3. in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
  4. The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
  5. In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.

One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.”

Apr 10

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.
Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:
“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:
The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.
One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.

Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:

“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:

  1. The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
  2. The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
  3. in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
  4. The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
  5. In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.

One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Apr 10

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.
Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:
“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:
The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.
One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.

Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:

“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:

  1. The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
  2. The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
  3. in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
  4. The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
  5. In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.

One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.” 

Apr 10
Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.
Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:
“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:
The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection). 
The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors. 
in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room. 
The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed. 
In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.
One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.”

Now you see it in black and white. To see the Wallace Collection in colour, technicolour, an explosion of hues, go to Lavender’s Blue.

Architect John O’Connell, who has just created the Dutch Galleries, talks to Lavender’s Blue about the Wallace Collection:

“I do believe the architect in charge of the 19th century renovations was Thomas Ambler and I expect he followed very closely the specific instructions as given by Sir Richard Wallace. In the main this consisted of the following:

  1. The installation of the staircase from the Hotel Toulouse in the centre of Hertford House (The Wallace Collection).
  2. The replacement of many of the doors with French revival double doors together with architraves and overdoors.
  3. in the small front State Drawing Room, the additional decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of this room as shown in 1900, and reinstated during our restoration of this room.
  4. The installation of a considerable amount of decorative plasterwork to the ceiling of the large back Drawing Room with decorative elements to all four walls and this has since been removed.
  5. In addition I expect he also constructed the Winter Garden at first floor level and maybe in due course, he also designed the large East Galleries 1 to 3 together with the Great Gallery and what is now the West  Galleries, though they in part have been remodelled.

One must also keep in mind the very large extensions that the 3rd Marquess carried out to the back of the Bagatelle. These in the main consisted of two standalone buildings at right angles to the villa and one of these still survives.”